For Evaluate It by SQM Inspectors - Evaluate Facebook Evaluate Twitter

Top Seven Provincial Parks in Ontario Featured

Rate this item
(0 votes)

We're in the midst of summer and hitting the start of fall! Now is the time to be outside in the  provincial parks that Ontario has to offer! With great beaches for the hot summer weather and awesome hiking trails for the breezy fall weather, Ontario has something for everybody! If you’re looking for a chance to spend some time with nature, here are 7 great campgrounds in Ontario that are perfect for the summer or fall!

  1. Algonquin Park – Ontario’s most well-known provincial park is several hours north of Toronto. It is home to thousands of lakes with eight major campgrounds, each of which are nearly the size of a provincial park. Algonquin has an informative visitor centre, providing natural heritage education programs, a logging museum and an art centre, among other things. And don’t be surprised if you spot a fair bit of wildlife. 
  2. Presqu’ile Park – Just off Brighton, Presqui’ile Park juts out into Lake Ontario. It’s known for its one kilometre boardwalk trail, spanning over one of the largest marshes in Lake Ontario, and for having the second oldest working lighthouse on Lake Ontario. Furthermore, sixteen kilometres worth of trails allows one to ride/walk through the entirety of the park.
  3. Balsam Lake Park – Located North of Peterborough on Balsam Lake, this park offers a variety of aquatic activities from swimming, canoeing, boating, and fishing. For those who get sick of camping in a tent, rental cottages by the water are also an option for the posh campers.
  4. Longpoint Park – The fourth oldest provincial park in Ontario, Longpoint, is located on a piece of land jutting out into Northern Lake Erie. It is a great location for bird watching with more than 300 species of birds that migrate to and from Longpoint every year.
  5. Killbear Park – Just off Parry Sound, Killbear Park is known for its 30,000 islands. It also has a diverse landscape with rock outcroppings, a variety of forest types, and sandy beaches. It is the ideal location to explore Canada’s geological history through trail walks or just kicking back and relaxing on one of its many beaches.
  6. Sandbank Park – Sandbanks is near Presqui’ille Park, located south of Belleville in Prince Edward County. Like Balsam Lake, Sandbank is well known for its beaches and camping grounds, but is also a great place to explore the dune habitat in Ontario. Furthermore, there is a great educational program on the park, that the whole family can take part in.
  7. Pinery Park – Located on Lake Huron between London and Sarnia, Pinery Park deserves distinction for being ranked as one of the top ten best places in the world to watch the sunset, by National Geographic. While you’re waiting for the sun to set, there are also several trails which wind through a variety of forests and dunes, or you can pitch a tent, sit back, relax, and watch the sun go down.

All park listings and any further information can be found at www.ontarioparks.com, as well as cool hints and beginner guides to camping.

 

Read 77073 times Last modified on Wednesday, 06 August 2014 23:09
Wednesday, 06 August 2014 23:00

528 comments

Leave a Reply